photo9 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School

MISTAKE ONE – Underestimate the power of the iPad

Students do not need to be taught how to use the iPad, but rather how to get the most out of it. They need to be taught how they can use it to create and demonstrate incredible things, to share their learning and connect it with the real word, and to promote deeper thinking.

MISTAKE TWO – Neglect to make real world connections

Most students’ use social media, but not necessarily in a way to learn or to connect in meaningful ways. Blogs, Twitter, Instagram all of these programs work on the iPad and can be used to allow students to learn from each other and to share their learning with others. These tools allow them to take REAL action in the REAL world.

MISTAKE THREE –The iPad alone will not help kids think deeply

Kids need help to find apps that allow them to experience learning in new ways, to think outside the box, and to dig deeper. Students need practice using a range of apps, not just become experts with a few. By showing them that new learning opportunities present themselves constantly, we can eventually demonstrate that new learning tools mean new possibilities and not more of the same old style of learning.

MISTAKE FOUR – Treating the iPad like a computer

When it comes to word-processing – let students use a computer, it is incredibly difficult to format Pages on the iPad and the continual auto spell check can be very frustrating. Focusing on iPad-versus.-laptop comparisons stifles the ability to see how the iPad facilitates student-centered learning.

MISTAKE FIVE – Not taking advantage of the mobility of the device.

iPad mobility means that students can move about taking photographs, recording audio, and shooting video, in any number of places. They can make multimedia stories, demonstrate how to solve math problems, create and simulate virtual experiences of virtually anything, and on and on. The skill of learning to edit media to enhance a project will be essential for the future. Active creativity and personalized learning are some of the main assets of any tablet.

MISTAKE SIX –  Sharing iPads between classes

iPads were designed as a single-user device and are not meant to be shared. Lack of finances in these difficult times have forced many schools to abandon 1:1 aspirations, but sharing ipads defeats the purpose. iPads stored and shared on carts by several classrooms cause precious time away from learning. This also hinders the ability to have separate student accounts, and all too often much time is wasted in disbursement of the tool itself.

MISTAKE SEVEN – Resistance to change

Often  communicating to the community the reasons why their districts are purchasing iPads is not made clear by boards of educationa and adminitstators. How they will be used and how they will benefit the learner is not explained, as a result, many initiatives face resistance from teachers and parents. Even some students don’t understand why or even want these devices being brought into their classrooms. IT directors need to expalin the why’s and how’s of these particular devices. Teachers need extensive training, not just a one-day of professional development. iPads are engaging, but they can also be a huge distraction. Technology needs to be all about the learning; hence the importance of using this device to its fullest potential.

MISTAKE EIGHT – Over use of ebooks

The iPad supports necessary skill areas and innovative self-expression, different styles of media literacy, unfathomed creativity, and the ability to personalize learning. Instead of focusing on ebooks or forgetting the power of audio that can be connected to ebooks, they should instead be emphasizing the incredibly active learning environment the iPad offers and the unique opportunities to develop student-directed learning. IT Directors should highlight some of the beneficial activities the iPad facilitates as well as the student empowerment it holds.

MISTAKE NINE – Pre-Planning

This mistake comes as an addition to the original eight in response to the blog written by Alexander McDougall, he stated:  Before any decision to purchase is made school and/or district administrators and IT managers need to discuss the advantages AND limitations of the iPad in the classroom.  It’s also important for teachers to be part of this discussion in its early stages.  In an ideal world there should be preliminary PD offered to teachers (though in the real world where funds are limited, this often doesn’t happen).  During this research and planning time, administrators can get a good understanding of how the devices will enhance their classrooms and will be able to speak to those questions when they come from parents and other members of the community. Thanks Alexander for the input, well stated, in an ideal world…

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17 Responses to 9 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School

  1. […] 8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School (“@remcopijpers: Meest gemaakte fouten met iPads op school http://t.co/eiuiv3ZwJM”; @EduxOA en @Innofun halen het beste uit ICT in #onderwijs)…  […]

  2. […] “8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School (RT @AtomicLrngUK: Here are some frequent mistakes made when it comes to using iPads in schools: http://t.co/VgidP173PN #edtech)…”  […]

  3. […] MISTAKE ONE – Underestimate the power of the iPadMISTAKE TWO – Neglect to make real world connectionsMISTAKE THREE –The iPad alone will not help kids think deeplyMISTAKE FOUR – Treating the iPad like a computerMISTAKE FIVE – Not taking advantage of the mobility of the device.MISTAKE SIX – Sharing iPads between classesMISTAKE SEVEN – Resistance to changeMISTAKE EIGHT – Over use of ebooks  […]

  4. […] iPad mobility means that students can move about taking photographs, recording audio, and shooting video, in any number of places. They can make multimedia stories, demonstrate how to solve math problems, create and simulate virtual experiences of virtually anything, and on and on. The skill of learning to edit media to enhance a project will be essential for the future. Active creativity and personalized learning are some of the main assets of any tablet.  […]

  5. Mary Starnitcky says:

    Our district has I-pads for every 6th, 7th and 8th grade student. We are in our 2nd year. We have introduced them gradually… My problem is the “police-ing” you have to do…we have problems with kids playing games, instant messaging, and taking photos…30+ kids in a class for 40 minutes it is a HUGE challenge that our district did not think through. I have special boxes on each table the kids have to put them in, and may only take out when they are told. I teach art…I have them make a portfolio of taking pictures of their projects in progress…and then a final project…! I then have proof of their work to share with their parents! That is an awesome tool! I suggest to other schools to block games, social networks, etc. Been there and done that and very frustrated…

  6. Joce says:

    Hey, nowhere in the article does it say TEACHERS make these mistakes! That teachers are frustrated by the way iPads are used (as indicated by the comments) just further illustrates exactly what the mistakes are: not mandating 1:1 iPad use, blocking useful apps (not an issue if the iPad is owned by the student), blocking social media accounts, etc.
    This article should be used by teachers (and by IT people and EdTech committees) to show administrators others’ experiences and frustrations, and, one hopes, have them work toward avoiding these mistakes.

  7. Ellen says:

    I find your website helpful, interesting and agree with some of what you publish. However, this article shows how OUT of touch you are with the real world and the challenges teachers face in using technology. This article should be NOT about mistakes teachers make but challenges we face, that inhibit us from using technology effectively.

    Mistake Two: “Neglect to make real world connections” – Teachers would love to social media more but many districts do not allow access to social media, have most of it blocked. Blogs are allowed but many districts continue to restrict the use of these. Yes, we can submit what we want to use in the way of social media. After waiting for a while, we may get a yes to certain ones. . .but Twitter? No way.

    Mistake Three: “The iPad alone will not help kids think deeply” I completely agree with that statement. However, you go on to say, “Students need practice using a range of apps.” Having used ipads regularly, I completely agree with this but again, find myself and my students are limited to apps that are allowed by district, which makes exploring a “range” of apps extremely difficult if not impossible. Submitted countless requests for specific apps and more apps is a possibility but after 3 years, not much has been approved.

    Mistake Six: “Sharing iPads between students.? I got a real chuckle from this one! This has got to be YOUR biggest mistake! Please do a reality check! In case you haven’t heard, schools are not LOADED with limitless money for purchasing 1:1 ipads. With very recent and deep budget cuts, that is even more of a reality. So, yeah sharing is what has to happen. . .NOT a teacher MISTAKE but an absolute reality.

    Mistake Seven: “Resistance to change”. This one has me shaking my head! “School administrators often fail to communicate to their districts why they’ve purchased iPads.” You have this backwards. When we purchased ipads, we had high hopes (AND communicated these to district), of using them in innovative ways only to be cut short by district controls. NO social media is allowed. Only district can add apps and if we suggest any, it takes at least 6 months for it to be approved and added. We communicate with the district regurlarly but they control it all.

    As always, thank you for your article. I hope my response gave you some food for thought. Please consider what I’ve posted as a suggestion to be sure you have the facts about what is REALLY happening in our classrooms and the challenges teachers face. We already take enough of a beating. I can speak for most of us. We care. We want to use technology. We want our students to create, explore, become critical thinkers etc. Schools want students to have access. Please think beyond what is happening as a school or teacher mistake. They are challenges.

    • Teachers With Apps says:

      I would like to apologize to any teacher that has taken offense to this blog post. This is not about teachers – it is about the misuse of a tool in a broken establishment. I know, I am a teacher and still in the classroom! I feel your frustration, and you are right, the title should have been: Challenges of Using iPads in School! Jayne Clare

    • Karen says:

      Agree completely with Ellen. This was a nice attempt but lacked the real insight of a teacher and the reality that students already know how to use cameras, videos and social media and not always in a constructive manner.

  8. For the moment, iPads have to be shared, so this is hardly a mistake. Perhaps another article about good practice in sharing devices might be useful.

  9. […] “ 8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School”  […]

  10. […] 8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School  […]

  11. […] "MISTAKE ONE – Underestimate the power of the iPad Students do not need to be taught how to use the iPad, but rather how to get the most out of it. They need to be taught how they can use it to create amazing things, to share their learning and connect it with the real word, and to broaden their thinking."  […]

  12. […] 8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School MISTAKE ONE – Underestimate the power of the iPad Students do not need to be taught how to use the iPad, but rather how to get the most out of it.  […]

  13. […] “8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School MISTAKE ONE – Underestimate the power of the iPad Students do not need to be taught how to use the iPad, but rather how to get the most out of it.”  […]

  14. […] 8 Frequent Mistakes Made with iPads in School  […]

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