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I recently came across this report from the Nellie Mae Foundation when scouring for legitimate research on technology and implementation practices. Wow, I knew we were far from ready, but this article is downright frightening. This statement alone shows just how behind the eight ball we are and that reform is well overdue:  A recent survey of more than 1,000 high school teachers, IT staff and students shows that only 8 percent of teachers fully integrate technology into the classroom. This article seemed to spell out just what is needed and the focus on student-centered learning is what drew me into it in the first place. We all need to do our part to help other teachers overcome their fears and encourage administration to get moving with meaningful professional development in using and implementing technology successfully in classrooms. Read on and leave a comment, do you find this study viable?

Integrating technology with student-centered learning

A Report to the Nellie Mae Education Foundation 
prepared by Babette Moeller & Tim Reitzes

While technology can serve as a powerful education tool, it cannot drive reform on its own. To be widely adopted, technology must be part of a comprehensive and systemic effort to change education. This report provides a look at the potential that technology offers and the steps needed to better understand when technology is most effective in student-centered learning—and for whom. With the intent to expand education beyond traditional boundaries, student-centered learning focuses on educational practices and principles that:

  • Provide all students equitable access to the knowledge and skills necessary for college and career readiness in the 21st century
  • Focus on mastery of skills and knowledge, and align with current research on how people learn

As the principles guiding student-centered learning become more defined, increased attention is being paid to the tools and resources best suited to its successful adoption. On the surface, technology would seem to offer a natural—and accessible—way to advance student-centered learning. After all, in today’s public schools, there’s an average student to computer ratio of 4:1 and a teacher and student population ready, willing and able to use technology. Yet despite its availability, technology is not widely integrated into the learning experience. A recent survey of more than 1,000 high school teachers, IT staff and students shows that only 8 percent of teachers fully integrate technology into the classroom. Not surprising, 43 percent of students feel unprepared to use technology as they look ahead to higher education or their work life. To learn more about how technology could enhance student-centered learning, Education Development Center (EDC) examined current research literature as well as practice and policy-related reports. This research was enriched by collaboration with EDC colleagues who have expertise on this subject as well as interviews with educators at selected schools. This report concludes that while technology can provide a powerful teaching and learning tool, it cannot drive reform on its own. To be widely adopted, technology must be part of a comprehensive and systematic effort to change education. This report provides a candid look at the potential technology offers and the steps needed to better understand when technology is most effective in student-centered learning—and for whom.imgres

 The Potential Technology Offers

Because technology is both highly customizable and intrinsically motivating to students, it is particularly well suited to expand the learning experience. To date, research on the effectiveness of technology has focused primarily on higher education and professional development, yet it suggests that specific uses of technology can improve K-12 student outcomes as well.

READ the full Report HERE

Nellie Mae Education Foundation – Dedicated to reshaping public education in New England so that all learners get the knowledge and skills needed for success  

Photo by Jon Berkeley/Shutterstock

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2 Responses to RESEARCH: Integrating technology with student-centered learning

  1. […] A recent survey of more than 1,000 high school teachers, IT staff and students shows only 8 percent of teachers fully integrate technology into classroom.  […]

  2. […] I recently came across this report from the Nellie Mae Foundation when scouring for legitimate research on technology and implementation practices. Wow, I knew we were far from ready, but this article is downright frightening.  […]

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